David Nash

David  Nash

David Nash

David Nash, Professor of History, Oxford Brookes University, previously taught nineteenth and twentieth century British History at the Universities of Leicester and York. A fellow of the Royal Historical Society and an officer of the Social History Society of Great Britain, he directs the SOLON  project at Oxford Brookes University which links a number of University Departments in studying the interdisciplinary dimensions of crime and bad behavior from both contemporary and historical perspectives. Solon, one of the Seven Wise Men of Athens, was a noted legal reformer. The acronym, SOLON, stands for Society, Order, Law, Offences, Notoriety. Nash is also a Director of the Center for Inquiry in London and is currently giving advice to the European Parliament and the Irish Government on blasphemy laws in the European Union.

His paper at the conference, "'Little Liberty on Earth while men worship a tyrant in heaven:'  Nineteenth-Century Secularists in Britain and America and Implications of Constructing 'Religion' as Anachronistic Repressor," will explore ideas of 'religion' in the thought of secularists in Britain and America, such as  Richard Carlile, Robert Owen, George Jacob Holyoake, George William Foote, Robert Ingersoll, and Positivists such as Edward Spencer Beesley. Their assaults on religion, however, created another monolith, secularism, which has had enduring impact right through to our own time.

Letter from George Jacob Holyoake to Robert Browning. 3 January 1885<br />

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Letter from  George Jacob Holyoake to Robert Browning. 3 January 1885.

Holyoake acknowledges Browning’s receipt of his book, Travels in Search of Settlers Guide-book of America and Canada, 1884, and mentions sending Chicago & Alton Railroad’s Official Guide and Monthly Reprint and Advertiser, containing time cards, advertisements and a reprint from the latest English edition of the complete works of Robert Browning to the poet.

Your letter acknowledging the receipt of my little Book of Travels, gave me more pleasure than I deserved. It did reach me at Gt. Yarmouth, Nov 14th. It was on the 27th of the same month that I sent the Numbers of the Chicago R. R. Guide received from, and intended by Mr Charlton, for you.

Letter from George Jacob Holyoake to [Dr. Bind]. <br />
1 January 1893.<br />

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Letter from George Jacob Holyoake to [Dr. Bind]. 1 January 1893.

Stay where the rain is parsimonious—the wind reticent—the sunshine prodigal, and the frost crawleth not forth.  Tell Mr. Allen that the rain has been so incessant that it has washed Home Rule out of the minds of many; and not even a Fabian has a dry argument left. Black fogs hang over London like Tory Socialism through which no Liberal can see his way.

Emilie who is with me joins in my injunction and in New Year wishes.

Unwin is busy with a Second Edition of my Book—the only thing which softens the rigour of the winter. . .. The Tory National Observer and Saturday Review contain some sentences which I valued very much If I were at hand & could go over the reviews they would amuse you.

If I believed only half what they say I should be entirely intolerable to all my friends ever more.

 

- Exhibition Text by Melinda Creech

Edgar Fawcett. Agnosticism and Other Essays, With a Prologue by Robert G. Ingersoll. New York, Chicago, Belford: Clarke and Company, [1889].<br />

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Edgar Fawcett. Agnosticism and Other Essays, With a Prologue by Robert G. Ingersoll. New York, Chicago, and San Francisco: Belford, Clarke and Company, [1889].

George William Foote. Mr. Browning's New Poems: Dramatic Idyls. Liberal. Vol. 1, no. 6 (June 1879).<br />

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George William Foote. “Mr. Browning's New Poems: Dramatic Idyls.” The Liberal. Vol. 1, no. 6 (June 1879).

 

- Exhibition Text by Melinda Creech

David Nash