Joy Dixon

Joy Dixon

Joy Dixon

Joy Dixon, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, is currently working on two book projects, tentatively titled Sexual Heresies:  Religion, Science, and Sexuality in Modern Britain and Sexuality in Modern Europe. Her research interests are history of gender, sexuality and the body, history of religion, history of the social and human sciences, and history of empire.

Dixon’s paper, “Finding the Frame: Religion, Science, and Sexual Dissidence in Late-Victorian Britain,” explores that moment in the late nineteenth century when the anthropological and psychological frames emerged as dominant ones in the understanding of religious experience, focusing on the processes by which scientists in a diverse range of academic disciplines – from Sir James Frazer in anthropology to Havelock Ellis in sexology – began to characterize religious experiences as derived from or as a displacement of the sexual impulse.

 

Book plate and photos pasted into copy of Christopher Marlowe. Edited by Havelock Ellis. London: Vizetelly & Co., 1887 (London: Bradbury, Agnew, & Co.).

(Click to enlarge)

Book plate and photos pasted into copy of Christopher Marlowe. Edited by Havelock Ellis. London: Vizetelly & Co., 1887 (London: Bradbury, Agnew, & Co.).

This volume contains a bookplate which reads: “From the library of Algernon Charles Swinburne.” The pasted in photos are of Mary Ann Peabody. An inscription in the book indicates that the book was a gift to Francis Hyde Bangs, an English professor at Yale, who later became her husband. This volume, the unexpurgated edition, contains an explanation of the expurgation written by Mary Ann Peabody.

Christopher Marlowe. Edited by Havelock Ellis. London: Vizetelly & Co., 1887 (London : Bradbury, Agnew, & Co.).<br />

(Three images. Click to view and enlarge.)

Christopher Marlowe. Edited by Havelock Ellis. London: Vizetelly & Co., 1887 (London: Bradbury, Agnew, & Co.).

 

Letter from James George Frazer to Charles Whibley. 16 March 1927. <br />

(Click to view letter pages and transcriptions)

Letter from James George Frazer to Charles Whibley. 16 March 1927.

It is most kind of you to consent to write a preface to the speeches delivered at our gathering, and we, my Wife and I, highly appreciate your kindness and thank you for it. We only regret that you were not with us on March 1st, as we had hoped and expected. The words of the speakers on that occasion were so kind and cordial that we did not wish them to be lost on the empty air; so we have had a record of them made to remind us of them in future when they may have faded from the tablets of memory.

Please observe that the report which I send you herewith is the one made by the Reporter at the time. It contains, I believe, a few mistakes and omissions, but it will probably give you a sufficiently full and accurate idea of what was said to serve your purpose. We have received from almost all the speakers corrected versions of their speeches, but these we are keeping by us, as they will be wanted for the printers. We propose to send copies of the speeches, enriched by your preface, to all who were with us on March 1st and 2nd. The whole fathering was marked by a cordiality which surpassed our expectation and went to our hearts.

We leave for France next week, but we shall hope to have the pleasure of seeing you in summer at Cambridge or elsewhere.

 

- Exhibition Text by Melinda Creech

Joy Dixon